Archive for May, 2010

16
May
10

The singular case of Kalyani’s profundity

It has taken many years for Kalyani Warner to finally expend a few days of her 18th year visiting the Corbett Tiger Reserve with her Arun Chacha. These are her observations with my comments at the end of the photo feature.

What I anticipated:

Aware of the reducing tiger population I came to the Jim Corbett Park with very few hopes of sighting one. However, secretly, there was a small part of my heart that knew that not seeing a tiger would be most disappointing and not just for me but humanity in the larger sense.

When I saw the tiger:

When we saw the tiger, it was all very sudden. Ours was the only jeep there and we were separated by a small stream of water. It was just lying there… that’s when it hit me; it was one of the most beautiful sight ever… the most beautiful animal I had ever seen.

Continue reading ‘The singular case of Kalyani’s profundity’

Advertisements
14
May
10

Aal iz not necessarily well!

“A man’s mind may be likened to a garden, which may be intelligently cultivated or allowed to run wild; but whether cultivated or neglected, it must, and will bring forth. If no useful seeds are put into it, then an abundance of useless weed-seeds will fall therein, and will continue to produce their kind.” – James Allen

Last week I had an opportunity to once again saunter the corridors of the National School of Drama – from which in the late seventies – I had walked out after resigning my merit scholarship.

It was great to have met a senior whose work I admire and sorry to have missed my former room-mate. Of course, there were pompous personalities spouting philosophies as false as themselves.

Met teachers, actors, students and found that the intellectual malaise that ails our institutions still subsists. Essential questions for NSDians re the Theatre, the Arts and Education remained ambiguous or marginalised as the pursuit to stay ‘theatrically active’ consumed all thinking.

There was a time when my world and life was theatre and consequently everything and everybody involved with it became my family and education automatically established itself as an integral and valuable aspect of a situation that was on the threshold of becoming an accepted stereotype. In particular jeopardy was theatre for children and young people.

Continue reading ‘Aal iz not necessarily well!’